THE BREAKTHROUGH BRIEFING: APRIL 3

Welcome back to the Breakthrough Briefing!

Each week we collect our favourite campaigns that stood out and did something different. This week we’ve got a great mix from a moving charity campaign, drone-delivered treats, using code to hack flavours, a bus stop dispensing biscuits and wearable scents.

Wearable Old Spice

Old Spice aren’t afraid to do marketing differently and their latest campaign is no exception. Rather than the standard scented tab that most fragrances use in a printed ad, Old Spice have taken it one step further.

Their magazine spread featured a paper blazer big enough to wear in their signature red and of course coated in the signature smell.

Old Spice Breakthrough                (Image: The Drum)

We love this because it brings their slightly wacky edge to real people. Anyone who bought the magazine could experience, first-hand, the weird and wonderful nature of Old Spice. They’ve definitely done something different and upped the standards of what a perfume ad now entails.

Free Oreos!

To promote their new game and delicious cookies, Oreo are running an OOH campaign.

The Great Oreo Cookie Quest game is available as an app where people solve daily riddles and clues, but it’s also now at a London bus stop. Using an interactive poster, people can play to find hidden cookies. If successful, they are rewarded with real Oreos! The biscuits are dispensed from the bus stop in real time, and you can’t beat on-demand treats!

Oreo Bus Stop               (Image: Convenience Store)

It’ll run for two weeks, accompanied by panels and Transvision screens in train stations to direct people to the New Oxford Street Oreo bus stop.

We love this idea because lots of people can engage. Usually a one-off experiential has limited reach, but this allowed people to interact whenever it suited them. It’s also placing samples of cookies in the hands of people who are genuinely excited about the brand.

The Glenlivet Code Whiskey

Pernod Ricard have released a new whiskey that’s inspired by British codebreakers. Keeping to the theme the bottle’s packaging doesn’t reveal any information about tastes or aromas and instead leaves that up to a quiz.

Glenlivet Code Whiskey               (Image: FoodBev)

Customers can Shazam the bottle and unlock an underground room where they’ll meet master distiller Glenlivet who will ask to decipher the four aromas and flavours from a variety of options.

Pernod Ricard will release the taste information at the end of the year, giving the ‘coders’ and whiskey drinkers time to unlock the secret for themselves.

Drone-delivered Pizzas

HBO’s Silicone Valley is reaching its fifth season and they decided to treat the fans of the show with free pizza. (The way to everybody’s heart!)

In the first episode on the new season the main character bankrupts a fictional pizza delivery app called Sliceline.

So, with the pizza theme in mind, hungry watchers could order one by tweeting #Sliceline and a pizza emoji. For the lucky few, they’d receive a confirmation and pizza that arrived in a branded Sliceline box.

The deal ran across Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York. 20 drone deliveries were allowed per city and the rest was by person, reaching a total of 714 free pizzas.

We like this idea because it gives something back to the already loyal fans, which is a relationship that’s always important to work on. It also generated buzz for the new season and encouraged new interest in the show.

CALM

CALM, (campaign against living miserably) is a UK charity leading the movement against male suicide, which is the single biggest killer for men under 45.

At the moment, 84 men take their own lives each week. That fact is shocking and surprising which is why CALM aim to bring attention to, and end stigma around, men’s mental health.

To really hit home they commissioned 84 sculptors made by Mark Jenkins and placed them on ledges around Southbanks buildings.

CALM campaign              (Image: The Drum)

The project is sponsored by grooming brand Harry’s. ITV also ran interviews and other programmes about male suicide for three days alongside the campaign.

We think this was an incredibly powerful message and using the sculptors brought the human element to the statistics.

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