THE BREAKTHROUGH BRIEFING: 30 JULY

Welcome back to the Breakthrough Briefing! Once again, we’ve got a selection of our favourites campaigns around the world right now.

Dirt is good

Omo, the laundry brand, has created the world’s first kids book activated by soil.

To encourage kids to play outside and step away from technology, the “Story of Spots and Stripes’ is only visible if they rub dirt on the pages.

Omo dirt activated book campaign                 (Image: Adweek)

South African artist Karabo Poppy created the story of unity. The tale of a tiger and cheetah cub who realise they look the same once they’ve rolled around in the mud. The book was shared in South African schools and Omo hope to get it on the national curriculum.

We love this idea because it shows that, once kids have had fun enjoying themselves and living life to the fullest, Omo are there to help out. It’s a great message to promote and we think a lot of parents will appreciate it. We’re hoping to book will come to England too!

Free whiskey

Scottish whiskey brand The Macallan have taken sampling to the next level.

For those 21 and over, there’s free whiskey to be had at Grand Central Station. Travellers and commuters step into the 15 x 15 x 15 box and arrive in Scotland. Nearly.

Once inside they’re greeted with the smell of fresh grass and Scottish river wind. They can look out at the vast, beautiful landscape of Speyside and the story of The Macallan begins.

Mcallan Distillery experiential campaign               (Image: Haute Living)

Although this is in part promoting the whiskey, the experiential also gives a taste of what travellers to Scotland can expect when they visit the actual distillery. Although most visit include a tour, a story and some tasting, the Macallan Distillery does much more. The multimedia hooks transform the experience into an interactive day out.

We think this is a great idea to show The Macallan as more than just the drink, their brand is an experience. There’s a lot of pressure to ‘do more’ at the moment and we think The Macallan have definitely got it right.

Pink Tax

The pink tax is long associated with personal care, beauty and feminine hygiene products but Burger King have brought it to food.

To highlight the archaic and discriminatory tax, Burger King started charging women extra for their fries. Why? Because they came in a pink box.

The video highlights how the tax has been normalised, even by women, and shows how important it is to fight back.

This is a great example of a brand setting out their purpose and showing consumers they care about their lives beyond just the burgers.

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